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Everyone Loves Buttons Customer Spotlight – GM

Everyone Loves Buttons™ has made hundreds of thousands of buttons over the years for hundreds of clients, big and small. We’ve worked with restaurants, sports organization, non-profit and charity groups, marketing agencies and more. Some clients need a couple hundred buttons to meet their needs, while others needed a couple thousand! Every custom button job, big or small (and even rush order), is important to us at Everyone Loves Buttons™, but one of the biggest and coolest jobs we ever had meant creating 10s of thousands of buttons for GM for the Detroit Auto Show.

Here is the story of 10,000 buttons right from our CEO Maura Statman,

One of our clients is the advertising agency for GM. Two years ago I was invited to participate in a special project that took place at the North American international auto show (NAIAS) in January 2012. This annual show in Detroit, MI kicks off the auto industry’s newest models. I was invited to  train hired staff (from the local talent and modeling agency) who were to make buttons during the show.  There were preprinted graphic inserts that show attendees decorated themselves  and then the button staff assembled the buttons right there and then.

GM had a button booth constructed, which at the time was part of the rollout of the Chevy Sonic car targeted to the 20-something driver. The button booth was transported to the various US  and international auto shows throughout that year. Not only did our company make tens of thousands of pre-made buttons for the show in various designs, but we also supplied all of the button parts and machines as well. The button booth concept and the “make your own button” activity was a huge success and is still being used in 2014.

Event and promotional buttons are a great way to promote your company, your brand, and your products. And while you may not have the marketing budget to order 10s of thousands of buttons and create a whole button booth for your next event, even a few hundred custom designed buttons can go a long way!

Use Buttons to Bring Conference Attendees to Your Booth

At industry conferences, most companies are looking to connect with potential customers, and sometimes new business partners, by showing off their latest and greatest products/services, trying to generate some buzz around their company with cool demos or presentations, and build up their overall brand as an industry thought leader. But having a great booth is only half the battle at an industry conference—everyone there has a great booth! So how can you make your company, your brand, and your booth the place to be at your next conference appearance? With custom buttons of course! Read More

Kiss Me, I’m Irish!

Kiss Me, I’m Irish!

With St. Patrick’s Day coming up in a few weeks, “Kiss Me, I’m Irish,” buttons and shamrock sunglasses are popping up on shelves all over the place. But why exactly do Irish lads and lasses deserve so much love? Why don’t we see “Kiss Me, I’m Italian” or “Kiss Me, I’m Greek” buttons and tee shirts around other holidays? What’s the story behind Irish kisses?

Every heard the phrase “luck of the Irish“? The phrase is commonly thought to mean “extreme good fortune.” After all, who doesn’t wish they were a little luckier when it comes to money, love, or work? However, according to Edward T. O’Donnell, an Associate Professor of History at Holy Cross College and author of 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About Irish American History, the term has not an Irish origin but “a happier, if not Buttons for Foxs Proud to be Irishaltogether positive,” American one.

During the gold and silver rush years in the second half of the 19th century, a number of the most famous and successful miners were of Irish and Irish American birth. . . .Over time this association of the Irish with mining fortunes led to the expression ‘luck of the Irish.’ Of course, it carried with it a certain tone of derision, as if to say, only by sheer luck, as opposed to brains, could these fools succeed.

These “lucky” miners got people everywhere wishing they had a little more Irish luck working in their favor! “Kiss me, I’m Irish” is a spinoff of “luck of the Irish,” were non-Irish folks could steal a little bit of that luck away with a kiss!

Turns out Irish people aren’t the only ones worth kissing is you want a little luck. The Blarney Stone is a block of bluestone built into the battlements of Blarney Castle, Blarney. According to legend, kissing the stone endows the kisser with the gift of the gab (aka “blarney.”) Millions of tourists have kissed the stone over the years, hoping to walk away with that Irish gift for gab that seems to bring about such good luck!

Popular Irish band Gaelic Storm wrote a song called Kiss Me I’m Irish;

Kiss me, I’m Irish!
I am the wild rover.
My eyes they are smiling,
And I’m seldom sober.
I like my whiskey,
And I love to dance,
So if you’re feeling as lucky as me, take a chance,
And kiss me, I’m Irish…

Everyone Loves Buttons® has produced plenty of St. Patrick’s Day buttons over the years and we’d love to print yours! Are you a bar hosting a special St. Patrick’s Day event? Or an Irish-American organization marching in your town’s parade this year? Every Loves Buttons can get your custom designed button printed and shipped in a just a few days, just in time for your St. Patrick’s’ Day party!

Get Your Custom Buttons in Time for the Big Game!

Whether you’re a die-hard Broncos fan or part of Seattle’s 12th man fandom, the Big Game is coming up in just a few weeks! Do you have all your team swag ready to go? If you’re a fan or local business owner looking for new ways to support your hometown team as they head off to New Jersey why not design a custom button and literally wear your team loyalty on your sleeve?

Custom Buttons for Diehard Fans

If you are hosting a big party for the Big Game why not impress your friends and family with some custom buttons designed specifically for your event! For instance, a Broncos fan that plans on tailgating all game long could create a custom button that is your personal “tailgate pass” for your friends, family, and guests. The design could be as simply as the Broncos logo with the date, or you could go all out and create a custom design just for your party! It’s a great memento to celebrate your team’s season-long success and commemorate your trip to the Big Game.Get Your Custom Buttons in Time for the Big Game!

Custom Buttons for Local Business Owners

Sports bars in Denver and Seattle are bound to be packed the day of the Big Game. Why not create custom buttons that your patrons can proudly wear and take home with them at the end of the day? This is a great way to both advertise your brand AND connect with local fans. Or, create custom buttons that promote special Big Game drinks or meal specials so fans know your business supports the hometown team with special deals. You could even offer the buttons as part of a larger prize pack that you award at the end of the night to the biggest superfans that came to your bar during the game.

Custom Buttons for Youth Sports Teams

What young football player doesn’t dream of playing in the Big Game one day? If you are the coach of youth football team in Denver or Seattle and plan on having your team over to watch the game why not create custom buttons for each of your players? Maybe you can have the button say “Future Super Bowl Champion” or incorporate your team’s logo with the Seattle Seahawks logo to show your team’s support?

Everyone Loves Buttons has the fastest turnaround time in the button industry! We can produce your buttons as quickly as needed to meet your deadline with our standard 1-3 day turnaround time, so even if you aren’t decided on a final design just yet you still have time to get your final order in to get your buttons in time for the Big Game. With 24 different shapes and sizes to pick from your custom button design will look just the way you want!

ELB Customer Button Spotlight – OP3, Inc.

Customer Button Spotlight – OP3

OP3, Inc. launched the Avon Walk for Breast Cancer in 2003. The Walk is a weekend-long event which allows participants to walk at their own pace up to a marathon-and-a half over 2 days. The point of the event was to offer Buttons for Avon Walk for Breast Cancer more options to participants which require fewer days and nights of participation, reduce the walk mileage yet keep it an endurance event. Since launching the Avon Walk for Breast Cancer series, over $240 million has been raised.

Every 3 minutes, there is a new diagnosis of invasive breast cancer. Every 13 minutes, a life is lost to breast cancer. The National Cancer Institute estimates that approximately 2.6 million U.S. women with a history of breast cancer are living today, more than half of whom were diagnosed less than 10 years earlier. Most of these individuals were cancer-free, while others still had evidence of cancer and may still be undergoing treatment.

For the second year Everyone Loves Buttons is creating custom buttons for OP3 and their many Avon Walks. The cancer survivors at each event will receive a button with a number on it corresponding to the number of years they have survived cancer, celebrating the lives they have lived since beating cancer.

To learn how you can get involved with the Avon Walk for Breast Cancer please visit http://www.avonwalk.org/

There Is More Than One Way to Wear a Button

Button Backs because there is more than one way to wear a button:

When designing a custom button, most business owners don’t think about one crucial detail–how is anyone going to wear those buttons!? Most business owners choose the traditional pinback style because that might be the one they are the most familiar with, but there is more than just one way to wear a button.

Traditional Pinback 

A pinback button is simply fastened to a shirt or bag using a safety pin style mechanism. The first design for a pinback button was patented in 1896, and modern buttons are designed in very much the same way. Patent holders Whitehead & Hoag  said, “My present invention has reference to improvements in badges for use as lapel pins or buttons, or other like uses, and has for its primary object to provide … a novel means for connecting the ornamental shell or button to the bar or pin for securing the badge to the lapel of the coat.” And while pinback buttons may not seem like much of an invention, in 1896 zippers hadn’t even been invented! Early campaign buttons had to be sewn onto the lapel or worn as a pendent, so the pinback button was really quite a revolutionary product.Button Backs

Bar Magnet  

If you’d rather your employees or customer not poke holes in their clothes in order to wear your custom buttons, the bar magnet back is a great choice. This small, but powerful magnet, is a great backing option for larger and heavier buttons that might rip clothes if they were attached with a pin. This backing is also a great choice for places that want to recycle buttons amongst employees, or have a lot of buttons to choose from. For instance, a fast food restaurant might order their custom buttons with a bar magnet and just keep them all in a drawer in the main office. Employees can easily swap out the buttons each shift without poking dozens of holes in their uniforms.

Bulldog Clip

Bulldog clip backs look a lot like binder clips. The bulldog clip is attached to the back of the button and can be easily clipped onto a lapel or pocket so you don’t have to push a pin through your shirt. Bulldog clips are also great for attaching ID tags to lanyards. When choosing how your employees or customers are going to wear your buttons you have to figure out how they will be wearing them. If they will constantly be removing and putting the button back on, a bar magnet or bulldog clip fastener is probably a better choice because those won’t damage their clothes. But those fasteners can be a little more expensive, so if you are designing your custom budget on a budget the traditional pinback style might be a better choice.

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The Phoenix Boys Choir has been a client of Everyone Loves Buttons for the past several years and we are actually working on their 2014 buttons and zipper pulls right now! The boys get a custom button which corresponds with how much they raised as part of the organization’s fundraising efforts, and are acknowledged during a special ceremony.The Phoenix Boys Choir

Founded in 1947, the Phoenix Boys Choir has programs featuring training in voice, music theory, and performance for boys age 7 to 14. Currently, there are approximately 150 young boys and men participating.

These are an amazing group of boys with heavenly voices. Everyone Loves Buttons CEO, Maura Statman, had the pleasure of meeting one of boys who was in a past ballet class with her daughter. The families are engaged in extensive fundraising throughout the year and the higher level choirs travel throughout Europe during the summer.  The Phoenix Boys Choir has even won a Grammy! The Choir won a 2000 Grammy Award for Best Choral Performance for its recording of Penderecki’s Credo with the Oregon Bach Festival Orchestra and Chorus conducted by Helmuth Rilling. The group is so in-demand they have their own booking agent and can be hired for performances.

Please consider donating to the Phoenix Boys Choir and help keep this amazing group going!

4 Things to Consider When Designing a Political Campaign Button

George Washington wore the first political button at his inauguration in New York in 1789. Printed brass buttons were handed out to his 4 Things to Consider When Designing a Political Campaign Buttonsupporters, promoting his presidential campaign. The modern day button dates back to 1896 when the Whitehead and Hoag Company patented the campaign button. This political campaign button was made up of four pieces sandwiched together – a printed image with a slogan or photo of the 1896 candidates for President. With the mid-term elections coming in November of this year many politicians are already gearing up their campaigns, including designing and printing their political campaign buttons.

If you are looking to create a political campaign button for yourself this year here are four things to keep in mind: Read More

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One of the biggest mistakes business owners make when designing their custom buttons is that they try to squeeze too much into the design. Even a relatively large button, like a 6 inch round button, can only fit so much in terms of graphics and text and be visible from far away. Buttons are often called “walking billboards” because they can catch people’s attention from far away. But think of the billboards you actually notice when driving—chances are they rely on a few short words or catchy phrase, one large graphic, and primary colors. Too much information, even on a billboard, is too much for someone to take in completely one go. When it comes to billboards and buttons, less is more. Read More

Happy New Year!

 Our TEAM would like to wish everyone a Happy & Healthy 2014!

We are in this business because Everyone Loves Buttons®

2014 Happy New Year

 

 

New Year

New Year is the time at which a new calendar year begins and the calendar’s year count is incremented. In many cultures, the event is celebrated in some manner.[1] The New Year of the Gregorian calendar, today in worldwide use, falls on 1 January (New Year’s Day), as was the case with both the old Roman calendar and the Julian calendar that succeeded it. The order of months was January to December in the Old Roman calendar during the reign of KingNuma Pompilius in about 700 BC, according to Plutarch and Macrobius, and has been in continuous use since that time. In many countries, such as the Czech Republic, Italy, Spain, the UK, and the United States, 1 January is a national holiday.

During the Middle Ages in western Europe, while the Julian calendar was still in use, New Year’s Day was variously moved, depending upon locale, to one of several other days, among them: 1 March, 25 March, Easter, 1 September, and 25 December. These New Year’s Day changes were generally reversed back to January 1 before or during the various local adoptions of the Gregorian calendar, beginning in 1582. The change from March 25 – Lady Day, one of the four quarter days – to January 1 took place in Scotland in 1600, before the ascension of James VI of Scotland to the throne of England in 1603 or the formation of the United Kingdom in 1707. In England and Wales (and all British dominions, including the American colonies), 1751 began on March 25 and lasted 282 days, and 1752 began on January 1.[2] For more information about the changeover from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar and the effect on the dating of historical events etc., see Old Style and New Style dates.

A great many other calendars have been in use historically throughout the world, some of which count years numerically, and others that do not. The expansion of Western culture during recent centuries has seen such widespread official adoption of the Gregorian calendar that its recognition and that of January 1 as the New Year has become virtually global. For example, at the New Year celebrations held in Dubai to mark the start of 2014, the world record was broken for the most fireworks set off in a single display,[3] which lasted for six minutes and saw the use of over 500,000 fireworks.

Nevertheless, regional or local use of other calendars persists, along with the cultural and religious practices that accompany them. In many places (such as Israel, China, and India), New Year’s is also celebrated at the times determined by these other calendars. In Latin America, the observation of traditions belonging to various native cultures continues according to their own calendars, despite the domination of subsequent cultures. The most common dates of modern New Year’s celebrations are listed below, ordered and grouped by their appearance relative to the Gregorian calendar.